ACT I: "Reflections of the Way Life Used to Be"

Scene One:

March 22, 1958 born on a naval base in Great Lakes, Illinois, second of three children to Wilton & Lovelean Madison.

Scene Two:

May 10, 1962 moved to Portsmouth, Virginia, parents divorced, attended public schools, artistic and dramatic skills became apparent.

ACT II: "Livin', Lovin', Learnin', & Growin'

Scene One:

November, 1972 joined "Oasis" – Central Social Development of Portsmouth, Virginia. Volunteered time and energy working with underprivileged children and the elderly. Coordinated audio-slide presentation to recruit more volunteers.

Scene Two:

Junior Class President, Forensics Club President, nominated for Distributive Education Student of the Year, awards in Theater Work.

Scene Three:

May 1975, moved to Baltimore, continued active school life, publicity editor for yearbook, printmaking, theater, designed class sweatshirt, class button, senior favor and voted "Most Spirited" by senior class.

ACT III: "I'm Coming Out"

Scene One:

April 1976, father puts him out for being gay almost simultaneously with graduation, was forced to become self-supporting, moved to a small apartment and worked way up to assistant manager-in training at McDonalds, won a $50 bond for being named "Crewman of the Month."

Scene Two:

Started a series of short-lived jobs in search for that ultimate career goal: silk-screen presser, assistant to a tailor, teachers' aide, and model.

Scene Three:

September 1977, became a directory assistant operator, hoping the telephone company would open the doors for a communications career. Studying photography (at night) at Maryland Institute of Art, planning to transfer to the Graphics department of C&P. After 3 years of disillusionment and job pressures, resigned September 1980.

ACT IV: "Here I Am"

Scene One:

September 1980, volunteered services to West Baltimore Middle School, was asked to join staff as long-term substitute. Taught 8th grade English from September to December, created lesson plans, administered tests, attended P.T.A meetings, taught a mini-course in cooking, wrote a school song for W.B.MS., originated a mini-course called "Storytelling through Dance," created an audio-visual slide presentation on the growth of Rock Glen Junior High to West Baltimore Middle School and the concept of Middle Schools.

Scene Two:

To supplement income, became a model for the Maryland Institute College of Art, acquired a scholarship to the Cultural Arts Institute studying dance, acting, and voice.

Scene Three:

Work with the school system led to a position with the Business Management Inventory Team, acquiring information on all textbooks in the city schools.

Scene Four:

Studying Business at Sojourner-Douglass with the aspirations of owning his own business.

ACT V: "Mirror Mirror"

Scene One:

September 1981, became opening employee of the Hyatt Regency Baltimore. Work with the public led to a volunteer job as a demonstration model for Revlon hair products. An active employee, worked on employee newspaper, winner in employee '50s day costume contest. Winner in employee talent show.

Scene Two:

December 1982, model for Baltimore Campaign Against Vandalism, model for Metropolitan Baltimore Magazine, volunteer worker on the re-election campaign of delegate Larry Young.

Scene Three:

October 1983, wrote newspaper article for the Baltimore Afro American on racial discrimination at the Hyatt Regency. Currently working on his first collection of poems. Co-produced educational hairstyling seminar.

ACT VI: "Why Do Fools Fall in Love"

Scene One:

June 1985, best friend was brutally murdered. Fear of AIDS running rampant, decides to marry a female art student. Starts designing clothes and producing fashion shows. Joins an educational theater addressing teen pregnancy prevention and meets the dynamic director Kay Lawal.

Scene Two:

September 1988, launches own theater company Umoja SASA! To preserve the lost art of storytelling for African-American children. Within months also co-founds Actors Against Drugs with Kay Lawal. Tours East coast doing shows from New York to Bermuda for various companies and pursuing movie, commercial and TV roles.

Scene Three:

1989, now divorced, moves in with a Johns Hopkins research worker and begins a 7-year relationship. This relationship will open doors, create opportunities and offer the most security experienced in life. He will be a rock for the next 7 years. He helps launch a doll business, a store, new cars, nice homes, designer wardrobes, and a sense of social acceptance. In exchange, jealousy, insecurity and a total lack of sexual passion will be the cost.

ACT VII: "It's My Turn"

Scene One:

1991, audition for QVC shopping network. Selected as the only male to host on the launch of their new fashion channel. A year later conceives and produces the first-ever shopping show dedicated to products originating from Africa. Show generates over a million dollars and is repeated annually during Black History Month for the next 4 years. It also launches his career as a nationally-recognized doll designer.

Scene Two:

1994, Barry Diller (the man who puts the white blazer over Diana Ross during the New York Central Park rainstorm) buys QVC and cancels the fashion channel. Moves back to Baltimore, but not before going to New York and working on two movies that would change perspectives on gay life. The experiences of working on To Wong Foo: Thanks for Everything Julie Newmar and Stonewall, just as an extra would bring a sense of creativity never felt before.

Scene Three:

1995, using the stories from the experiences told by drag queens and merging it with true facets of real life, Darryl Wharton writes and directs a one-man show called FREEda SLAVE: Mask of a DIVA. The process of creating the show has the kind of impact that makes the relationship of 7 years nonexistent. Show goes on to win several acting and writing honors.

ACT VIII: "Ain't No Mountain High Enough"

Scene One:

1999, moved to Los Angeles for a successful four-month run of FREEda SLAVE and more theater review accolades.

Scene Two:

2002 shot a pilot, worked on independent films. Produced a "short-lived" feature film starring Joey Buttafucco. This film (Gangsta Mafia) would lead to financial disaster and leave him almost homeless as he restructed his life and find stable footing.

Scene Three:

2003 Moved to Inglewood and left acting to work in the world of movie promotions for Paramount Pictures.

ACT IX: "Take Me Higher"

Scene One:

2005 finds Dale single again and now enrolled in college after a 30 year absence. He begins working on his memoirs with only the sky as the limit for the next chapter of his life.

FAMILY TREE